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University of Oklahoma

course
Spring 2022 Advanced Programs - Advanced Programs Face to Face or Virtual - Human Relations

[H R 5110] Advanced Seminar-Current Probs - 221

professor
Zermarie Deacon

Course Description

Advanced Seminar: International Conflict Resolution - Virtual


In this course we will examine the realities if international conflict resolution. This will include a focus on what facilitates and inhibits the success of these efforts. 


Class Dates, Format, Location and Hours


DatesMarch 1 - 6, 2022
FormatVirtual
Location for on-site coursesBuilding BEQ G 42, Aereoporto Capodichino,
80144 Naples, Italy
Hours
Last day to enroll or drop without penaltyJanuary 31, 2022

Site Director


NameFred Cookerly
Office address/locationAdministrated from Rota, Spain
Office hoursMonday - Thursday- 0900-1530
Emailapnaples@ou.edu
DSN and CIV phoneDSN: 727-2799 or CIV: +34-956822799 

Professor Contact Information


Course Professor: Zermarie Deacon, Ph.D.
Mailing Address: Department of Human Relations
601 Elm Ave
PHSC 709
Norman, OK 73069
Telephone Number:405-325-2749
E-mail Address:Zermarie@ou.edu
Professor availability:The professor will be available via email to students before and after the class sessions. On-site office hours are half an hour before and after each class session, by appointment.

Textbook(s) and Instructional Materials

Student materials are available at the OU Bookstore Website at https://ou.textbookx.com/institutional/index.php. The website has book selling, renting, buying, returning, and order tracking capabilities. If you need help with an order, or if you have any questions contact the toll-free phone at 1-(855)-790-6637, agents are available from 9a – 5p (EST) Monday – Friday. Text prices are available online.


Materials posted on the OU Canvas learning management system: Access Canvas at https://canvas.ou.edu , enter your OU NetID and password, and select course to access material. If you require assistance with Canvas, please click on the Help icon. You can search the Canvas guides, chat with Canvas support, or contact OU IT. 


You can find an excellent resource on APA style and general academic writing at Purdue University’s Owl website located at http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/

Peaceland : Conflict Resolution and the Everyday Politics of International Intervention
Peaceland : Conflict Resolution and the Everyday Politics of International Intervention
by Autesserre, Séverine
Published by Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781107632042
Required
The Invisibilities of War and Peace in Sudan a Critical Analysis of International Conflict Resolution and Peacebuil
The Invisibilities of War and Peace in Sudan a Critical Analysis of International Conflict Resolution and Peacebuil
by Nascimento, Daniela
Published by Routledge
ISBN: 9781472487513
Required

Course Objectives

The goal of this course is to analyze the processes of international conflict resolution and to understand some of the underlying mechanisms that complicate this process. Just as international conflict is often complex and is rooted in many interlocking systems of difference, so conflict resolution is also complex. This is rendered even more so by the fact that conflict resolution is often undertaken by individuals and organizations that are foreign to the context of the conflict. We will investigate the complexities of this process.

Course Outline

The course will be conducted in a series of lectures, interactive group discussion, and media presentations, as well as individual presentations of selected chapter topics. Before the class, students should have read all the assigned readings.

Assignments, Grading and Due Dates

Attendance and Participation:


Attendance and participation in class discussions and activities are valuable aspects of any course because much of learning comes from discussions in class with other students. It is expected that you attend all classes and be on time except for excused emergencies. Excused absences are given for professor-mandated activities or legally required activities such as emergencies or military assignments. Unavoidable personal emergencies, including (but not limited to) serious illness; delays in getting to class because of accidents, etc.; deaths and funerals, and hazardous road conditions will be excused.


Individual Topic/Chapter Presentation:


A 15-20-minute class presentation on a chapter from your textbook will be required. Assignments of individual presentations will be made the first-class meeting. Please take the time to review the textbook and come prepared on the first day of class with your top three choices. Every effort will be made to accommodate everyone’s preferences.


Students will be asked to briefly summarize the content, critically analyze it and conclude their own reaction to the chapter (e.g., agree/disagree with the author, learned something or changed your views after reading the chapter, discussion of how the material fits within the larger class). Within the reaction portion of the presentation, please minimize prejudices, biases, unfounded beliefs, and reliance on emotional reactions, which can sidetrack good sound judgment and opinions rooted in your learning and in the human relations’ perspective. Presentations will receive a grade out of 100 points. We will discuss the format for the presentation and related grading criteria in more detail during our first-class session.


Book Reaction Paper:


You are required to read one additional book (listed above) before the first day of class. This book on Sudan provides a case study for international conflict resolution and its challenges. We will spend one class session discussing this book. We will use small group break-out sessions as well a larger a group discussion to analyze the book in preparation for your reaction papers.

You will additionally be required to submit (to Canvas and by midnight local time on the due date) a three to five-page, double-spaced reaction paper detailing your thoughts on and reactions to the (i.e., your substantive and substantiated reflections and thoughts on the material presented, the author’s perspective, and your reactions to the book). This paper should be informal, yet scholarly, and will provide you with a forum to link the book to the material we are covering in class. You may also provide your personal perspective as the book relates to your experiences or other classes you have taken. Papers showing the most depth of thought and analysis will receive the highest grades. Your paper will receive a grade out of 100.

Due Date: Sunday, March 27, 2022 Midnight


Final Paper:


You will need to complete a final paper discussing a case study in international conflict resolution of your choice.

Your paper should include an overview of the case study that you have selected. In your paper you should explore the dynamics of conflict resolution in your chosen case study, including factors that facilitated and inhibited the process. You should draw upon our class discussions to help you think through the type of analysis to engage in.


You need to use at least seven to ten sources for your paper, of which no more than two may be reports published by governmental, non-governmental, and/or non-profit organizations. One source may be a news article. The remainder of your sources needs to be scholarly books and/or journal articles. Only one of these may be a chapter we covered in class. Your paper should be approximately ten to fifteen pages long and should be typed, double-spaced, and should use conventional margins.

Finally, your paper needs to conform to APA formatting guidelines.


Your paper will receive a grade out of 100. Late papers will receive an automatic 10-point deduction for each day the paper is late. Final grades will be assessed in the following manner: 10 points for stylistic considerations (correct use of APA format, font, margins, page length, etc.); 60 points for content (the thoroughness of your discussion of the problem you selected, the completeness of your analysis of potential solutions to the problem, etc.); 30 points for critical thinking (the degree to which you provide a thoughtful analysis of the dimensions of the problem, the thoughtfulness of your discussion of potential solutions to the problem, etc.)


We will discuss the final papers and the selection of topics during the first day of class. Please give thought to the issue that you would like to address in order to participate fully in this discussion. Draw upon your textbooks and the book review books for examples of the kinds of problems you may want to consider. You may also email the instructor with any questions. On the third day of class, you will be asked to present your chosen topic to the class. This discussion will be brief and informal, will provide you with an opportunity to brainstorm with your colleagues and the professor about the ways in which intersectionality may be significant to your topic, and will serve to as an opportunity to expose others to the issues you are interested in.

Due date: Sunday, April 3, 2022, Midnight


Canvas:


Regular updates and relevant information regarding the course will be posted to Canvas. In order to ensure that you do not miss any new information of relevance to the course, you will be responsible for checking the announcements posted on Canvas for the duration of the class and while assignments are due. Also see the “links” page (under “modules” for websites that may be of interest to you and that are relevant to the course. Finally, all assignments are due in the relevant “assignment” tab on.

Grading

This is a letter-graded course: A, B, C, D, or F. A = 90-100%; B = 80-89%; C = 70-79%; D = 60-69%; F = 60%>


Tentative Timetable:

Day 1: Review syllabus, outline the week’s work, and start discussion of chapter 1.

Day 2: Discussion of chapters 2, 3, and 4.

Day 3: Students will share their final paper topics, allowing peers and the professor to give feedback on these topics and discussion forum of chapters 5, 6, 7, and conclusion.

Day 4: Book reaction discussion and any focus on the textbook that has not been completed

Day 5: Student presentations

Day 6: Student presentations and wrap-up


Assignment Due Date Percent of Grade
Attendance and Participation (5 points per day) N/A 15%
Final Paper Topics Beginning of 3rd day of class N/A
Book Review Discussion Day four N/A
Individual Topic/Chapter Presentation Saturday and Sunday 25%
Book Review Reflection Paper March 27, Midnight 20%
Final Paper April 3, Midnight 40%

Incomplete Grade Policy

Notice: Failure to meet assignment due dates could result in a grade of I (Incomplete) and may adversely impact Tuition Assistance and/or Financial Aid.

POLICIES AND NOTICES

Attendance/Grade Policy

Attendance and participation in interaction, individual assignments, group exercises, simulations, role playing, etc. are valuable aspects of any course because much of the learning comes from discussions in class with other students. It is expected that you attend all classes and be on time except for excused emergencies.

Excused absences are given for professor mandated activities or legally required activities such as emergencies or military assignments. It is the policy of the University to excuse absences of students that result from religious observances and to provide without penalty for the rescheduling of examinations and additional required class work that may fall on religious holidays. Unavoidable personal emergencies, including (but not limited to) serious illness; delays in getting to class because of accidents, etc.; deaths and funerals, and hazardous road conditions will be excused.

If you are obtaining financial assistance (TA, STAP, FA, VA, Scholarship, etc.) to pay all or part of your tuition cost, you must follow your funding agency/institution’s policy regarding “I” (Incomplete) grades unless the timeline is longer than what the University policy allows then you must adhere to the University policy. Students who receive Financial Aid must resolve/complete any “I” (Incomplete) grades by the end of the term or he/she may be placed on “financial aid probation.” If the “I” grade is not resolved/completed by the end of the following term, the student’s Financial Aid may be suspended make the student ineligible for further Financial Aid.

Students are responsible for meeting the guidelines of Tuition Assistance and Veterans Assistance. See the education counselor at your local education center for a complete description of your TA or VA requirements.

OU faculty will submit grades online through ONE not later than 30 days after the course end date. Course end dates are approximately one calendar month after the final seminar date on this syllabus and are provided on the official scheduling website for reference.

Academic Integrity and Student Conduct 

Academic integrity means honesty and responsibility in scholarship. Academic assignments exist to help students learn; grades exist to show how fully this goal is attained. Therefore all work and all grades should result from the student's own understanding and effort.

Academic misconduct is any act which improperly affects the evaluation of a student’s academic performance or achievement. Misconduct occurs when the student either knows or reasonably should know that the act constitutes misconduct. Academic misconduct includes: cheating and using unauthorized materials on examinations and other assignments; improper collaboration, submitting the same assignment for different classes (self-plagiarism); fabrication, forgery, alteration of documents, lying, etc…in order to obtain an academic advantage; assisting others in academic misconduct; attempting to commit academic misconduct; destruction of property, hacking, etc…; intimidation and interference with integrity process; and plagiarism. All students should review the Student’s Guide to Academic Integrity at http://integrity.ou.edu/students_guide.html 

Students and faculty each have responsibility for maintaining an appropriate learning environment. All students should review policies regarding student conduct at http://studentconduct.ou.edu/ 

Accommodation Statement

The University of Oklahoma is committed to making its activities as accessible as possible. For accommodations on the basis of disability, please contact your local OU Site Director.

Adjustment for Pregnancy/Childbirth-Related Issues

Should you need modifications or adjustments to your course requirements because of documented pregnancy-related or childbirth-related issues, please contact the professor as soon as possible to discuss. Generally, modifications will be made where medically necessary and similar in scope to accommodations based on temporary disability. Please see http://www.ou.edu/content/eoo/faqs/pregnancy-faqs.html

Title IX Resources

For any concerns regarding gender-based discrimination, sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, stalking, or intimate partner violence, the University offers a variety of resources, including advocates on-call 24/7, counseling services, mutual no-contact orders, scheduling adjustments, and disciplinary sanctions against the perpetrator. Please contact the Sexual Misconduct Office at smo@ou.edu or (405) 325-2215 (8-5), or the Sexual Assault Response Team at (405) 615 -0013 (24/7) to report an incident. To learn more about Title IX, please visit the Institutional Equity Office’s website at http://www.ou.edu/content/eoo.html 

Course Policies

Extended Campus (also and formerly known as Advanced Programs) policy is to order books in paperback if available. Courses, dates, and professors are subject to change. Please check with your OU Site Director. Students should retain a copy of any assignments that are e/mailed to the professor for the course. Neither duplicating services nor office supplies are provided.

Any and all course materials, syllabus, lessons, lectures, etc. are the property of professor teaching the course and the Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma and are protected under applicable copyright.

For more information about OU Extended Campus, visit our website at: http://www.goou.ou.edu/


Statement on Respect

The classroom should provide a safe learning environment where students can express their views without fear of reprisal. That freedom of expression must be balanced by demonstrated respect for other’s viewpoints and appropriate and reasonable sensitivity, especially within the context of scholarly disagreement.  Disrespectful or uncivil dialogue (including, but not limited to, personal attacks, insults, or harassment) will not be tolerated.


Recording Devices/Phones/Computers

It is important for students to be fully present during class to fully benefit from lectures, discussions, and experiential assignments. Class sessions may not be tape-recorded. All telephones and pagers should be turned off or placed on silent mode. Computers may not be used during class. Students who require an exception to this policy should discuss exceptional circumstances with the professor.

INSTRUCTOR VITA

Zermarie Deacon

Education

·        2007   Ph.D., Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan Department of Psychology. Cognate: Gender and International Development. Dissertation: An examination of factors influencing Mozambican women’s attainment of post-war well-being.

·        2003   M.A., Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan Department of Psychology. Thesis: The well-being of Muslim refugee women in resettlement: A needs assessment

·        1997   B.A. (Honours) Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa, Department of Politics; Major: Political Philosophy

·        1996   B.A., Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa, Major: Politics; Major: Philosophy


Current Positions

·        2007 - 2013         Department of Human Relations, University of Oklahoma, Assistant Professor

·        2007 – Present     Affiliate Faculty, School of International and Area Studies

·        2008 - Present      Women’s Studies Program, University of Oklahoma, Adjunct Professor

·        2012 – Present     Women’s and Gender Studies Program Center for Social Justice, University of Oklahoma, Affiliate Faculty

·        2013 – Present     Department of Human Relations, University of Oklahoma, Associate Professor


Frequently Taught Extended Campus (Advanced Programs) Courses

·        HR 5703  International Human Relations

·        HR 5013  Current Problems in Human Relations

·        HR 5970  The Role of Gender in Warfare


Major Areas of Teaching and Research Interest

·        In addition to Current Problems in Human Relations I also teach International Human Relations and Strategies for Social Change at the graduate level. At the undergraduate level I teach a class entitled Gender and War as well as International Human Relations and Social Change Processes.

·        My primary research interests are in cross-cultural definitions of health and wellbeing and factors that facilitate individuals’ attainment of wellbeing across different ecological contexts.


Representative Publications and Presentations

Publications:

  • Miller, C., Deacon, Z., Smith, A., Brady, S. R (2021). Visions of health: The Girl Power Photovoice project. Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology, 13(1), 43-56.
  • Deacon, Z. (2017). Review of: Stop global street harassment: Growing activism around the world. [Review of the book Stop global street harassment: Growing activism around the world, by H. Kearl]. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 41(1), 132.
  • Sykes, B., Pendley, J., & Deacon, Z. (2017). Transformative learning, citizenship, and cultural restoration: A case study of Native American service-learning at a research university. Gateways: International Journal of Community Research and Engagement, 10, 204-228.
  • Miller, C., Deacon, Z., Smith, A., & Abernathy, P. (in press). Visions of health: The Girl Power Photovoice project in D. Moxley, J. Bishop, & J. Miller-Cribs (Eds), Photovoice methods in social work: Using visual and narrative techniques in participatory research and practice.
  • Moxley, D. P., Thompson, V., & Deacon, Z. (2017). Donor involvement in Community-Based Action Research: A typology for advancing reflexive decision-making to protect essential participatory values in L. Rowell, C. D. Bruce, J. M. Sosh, & M. M. Riel (Eds), The Palgrave international handbook of action research, pp. 563-578. New York, NY: Pelgrave Macmillan US.
  • Miller, C., Deacon, Z., & Fitzgerald, K. (2015). Visions of collaboration: The Girl Power Photovoice project. Journal of Community Engagement and Scholarship, 8(1), 98-105.
  • Moxley, D., Deacon, Z., & Thompson, V. (2013, July). Action research and development for intrinsic innovation in social service administration: Prototyping and proof of concept in small scale start-ups. Action Learning and Action Research Journal, 18(2), 37-68.
  • Deacon, Z. & Moxley, D. (2012). Donors as stakeholders in Participatory Research: Praxis as typology in assessing and framing their roles. Action Learning, Action Research Association Inc. Monograph Series. (No. 3).
  • Deacon, Z. Pendley, J., Hinson, W., & Hinson, J. (2011). Chokka-chaffa' kilimpi', Chikashshiyaakni' kilimpi': Strong family, strong nation. American Indian and Alaskan Natives Mental Health Research: The Journal of the National Center, 18(2), 41-63.
  • Deacon, Z. & Bert, S. (2010). Teaching diversity: A reflection on the impact of identity on our work as educators. Free Inquiry in Creative Sociology, 38(1), 35-45.
  • Deacon, Z. (2010). Mozambique: The gendered impact of warfare. In T. Falola & H. ter Haar (Eds). Narrating wars and peace in Africa (pp.141-154). Rochester, NY: University of Rochester Press.
  • Deacon, Z. & Sullivan, C. (2010). An ecological examination of rural Mozambican women’s attainment of post-war well-being. Journal of Community Psychology, 38(1), 115-330.
  • Deacon, Z. & Sullivan, C. (2009). Responding to the complex and gendered needs of refugee women. Affilia: Journal of Women and Social Work.
  • Deacon, Z., Foster-Fishman, P., Mahaffey, M., & Archer, G. (In press). Moving from pre-conditions for action to developing a cycle of continued social change: Tapping the potential of minigrant programs. Journal of Community Psychology.
  • Nowell, B., Berkowitz, M., Deacon, Z., & Foster-Fishman, P. (2006). Revealing the cues within community places: Stories of identity, history, and possibility. American Journal of Community Psychology, 37(1-2), 29-46.
  • Foster-Fishman, P., Nowell, B., Deacon, Z., Nievar, M. A., & McCann, P. (2005). Using methods that matter: The impact of narrative, reflection, and voice. American Journal of Community Psychology, 36(3-4), 275-291.
  • Goodkind, J. R. & Deacon, Z. (2004). Methodological issues in conducting research with refugee women: Recognizing and re-centering the multiply marginalized. Journal of Community Psychology, 32(6), 721–739.

Presentations:

·        Deacon, Z., Nhkata, D., & Acar, H. (2021, June). Understanding intersectional inequalities in postsecondary education: Retention, connectedness, Black Women, and STEM. Poster presented at the 18th Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action, online.

·        Miller, C., Noyori-Corbett, C., Deacon, Z. (2019, May). GirlPower Photovoice Project. Paper presented at the The Asian Conference on the Social Sciences, Tokyo, Japan.

·        Deacon, Z. & Miller, C. R. (2018, October). Decolonizing service learning. Poster presented at the7th Annual International Conference of Community Psychology, Santiago, Chile.

·        Moxley, D., Thompson, V., & Deacon, Z. (2016, April). Donor Influence in Community- Based Action Research: A Typology for Advancing Reflexive Decision-Making to Protect Essential Participatory Values. In L. Rowell (Chair), International Action Research: Sharing Public Scholarship in Diverse Global Educational Contexts. Symposium presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association.

·        Deacon, Z. (2015, June). Conducting effective, ethical, and collaborative cross-cultural and social change oriented research under complex circumstances. Roundtable conducted at the 15th biennial conference of the Society for Community Research and Action, Lowell, Massachusetts.

·        Deacon, Z. & Miller, C. (2015, June). Effective and transformative service learning. Roundtable conducted at the 15th biennial conference of the Society for Community Research and Action, Lowell, Massachusetts.

·        Miller-Cribs, J., Miller, G., Miller, C. R., Deacon, Z., & Moxley, D. (2014, January). Using Photovoice in Social Work practice research to enhance community-university partnership. Workshop conducted at the Society for Social Work and Research annual conference, San Antonio, Texas.

·        Miller, C. R. & Deacon, Z. (2013, October/November). Photovoice as group work. Roundtable presented at the 59th annual program meeting of the Council of Social Work Education, Washington, D.C.

·        Lien, A., Darlston-Jones, D., Dworkin, D., Grohe, H., Barlow, J., Ronayne, M., Thai, N., Belyaev-Glantsman, O, Rowley, R., Long, S., & Deacon, Z. (2013, June). Social justice in the classroom: Teaching controversial topics. Roundtable Presentation held at the Biennial Conference of the Society for Research and Action, Miami, Florida.

·        Miller-Cribs, J., Miller, G., Miller, C. R., Deacon, Z., & Moxley, D. (2014, January). Using Photovoice in Social Work practice research to enhance community-university partnership. Workshop conducted at the Society for Social Work and Research annual conference, San Antonio, Texas.

  • Miller, C., Deacon, Z., Smith, A. (2012, November). The GirlPower Photovoice Project: A vision of partnership. Poster presented at the 58th annual program meeting of the Council of Social Work Education, Washington, D.C.
  • Miller-Cribbs, J., Miller, C., Deacon, Z., Miller, G. (2012, November). Using Photovoice in Social Work practice research to enhance community-university partnerships. Paper presented at the 58th annual program meeting of the Council of Social Work Education, Washington, D.C.
  • Chapple, C., Bones, P., Worthen, M., & Deacon, Z. (2012, November). Ecological correlates of sex trafficking in Oklahoma. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Chicago, Illinois.
  • Simons-Rudolph, J. M., Zimmerman, L., Deacon, Z., Olson, B. (2011, August). Examining the future of international community psychology to address global needs. (Paavola, E. & Amer, M. M., Chairs). Conversation hour held at the 119th Convention of the American Psychological Association, Washington, D.C.
  • Deacon, Z. & Bert, S. (2010, October). Teaching diversity: The impact of race and gender on our experiences as instructors. Structured discussion held at the Institute for the Study and Promotion of Race and Culture’s annual Diversity Challenge, Boston, Massachusetts.
  • Deacon, Z. (2010, June). Indigenous approaching to post-war recovery amongst Mozambican women. In Katie Thomas (Chair), Traditions for tomorrow: Indigenous and lived wisdoms. Symposium presented at the 3rd International Conference on Community Psychology, Puebla, Mexico.
  • Deacon, Z. (2010, June). Resolving challenges inherent in forming campus-community partnerships with indigenous communities. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on Community Psychology, Puebla, Mexico.
  • Sykes, B. E., Pendley, J., Deacon, Z., & Moxley, D. P. (2009, August). Promoting American Indian identity: A Learning Community model. Paper presented at the 117th annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Toronto, Canada.
  • Deacon, Z. (2009, June). Work/life/family: How women balance multiple roles in academia (M. M. Schehofer, Chair). Discussant as part of a town hall meeting held at the 12th Biennial Conference of the Society for Research and Action, Montclair, New Jersey
  • Chilenski, S. M., Deacon, Z., Evans, S. D., Hernandez, E. A. L., Sarkisian, G. V., & Schehofer, M. (2009, June). Establishing a career in community psychology: Issues, challenges, and opportunities (S. R. Torres-Harding, Chair). Roundtable discussion held at the 12th Biennial Conference of the Society for Research and Action, Montclair, New Jersey
  • Deacon, Z. (2009, May). Reaching the truly hard to reach: Methodological challenges for making psychology more representative. Paper presented at the 5th International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana-Champaign, Illinois
  • Deacon, Z. (2008, March). Factors that have facilitated Mozambican women’s recovery from the gendered impacts of warfare. Paper presented at the 2008 Africa Conference: Wars and Conflicts in Africa, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas.
  • Deacon, Z. & Sullivan, C. (2008, March). Factors supporting women’s recovery from war in developing nations. Poster presented at the 33rd Annual Conference of the Association for Women in Psychology, San Diego, California.
  • Deacon, Z. (2007, June). Considering the implications of socio-culturally determined definitions of wellbeing. Roundtable discussion at the 11th Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action, Pasadena, California.
  • Deacon, Z., Mahaffey, M. Archer, G. & Foster-Fishman, P. (2007, June). Using minigrants to build readiness and capacity for change in seven economically distressed neighborhoods. Poster presented at the 11th Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action, Pasadena, California.
  • Droege, E., Morales, M., Mahaffey, M., McNall, M., Deacon, Z., & Foster-Fishman, P. (2007, June). Revealing conversations: Negotiating power in community-based multiple stakeholder groups. Poster presented at the 11th Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action, Pasadena, California.
  • Karim, N. & Deacon, Z. (2005, June). Conducting effective, ethical, community psychology research internationally. Roundtable discussion at the 10th Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action, Urbana-Champagne, Illinois.
  • Nowell, B., Deacon, Z., & Foster-Fishman, P. (2003, November). Photovoice: A powerful tool for evaluation. Demonstration conducted at the Annual Conference of the American Evaluation Association, Reno, Nevada.
  • Deacon, Z., Madsen, P., Bybee, D., & Sullivan, C. (2003, June). A needs assessment of women with abusive partners. Poster presented at the 9th Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action, Las Vegas, New Mexico.
  • Deacon, Z. (2003, June). Assessing early implementation strategies for resident engagement. In L. Van Egeren (Chair), Neighborhood voices: Data sources and stories for implementation and evaluation. Symposium conducted at the 9th Biennial Conference of the Society Community Research and Action, Las Vegas, New Mexico.
  • Goodkind, J. & Deacon, Z. (2003, June). Methods for including multiple perspectives in research with refugees. Roundtable discussion at the 9th Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action, Las Vegas, New Mexico.


Representative Honors and Awards Received

·        2020   PI: Deacon; Co-PI: Acar; Co-PI:Nkhata - Understanding intersectional inequalities in postsecondary education: Education, retention, connectedness, black women, and STEM. Inequities in the Academic Research and Creative Activity Enterprise Rapid Response Seed Grant Opportunity.

·        2011   PI: Deacon; Co-PI: Pendley (Center for Applied Social Research, OU); Co- PI: Jervis (Center for Applied Social Research, OU) – CHRs as facilitators of health for Chickasaw elders. OU Center for Research Program Development and Enrichment, Faculty Research Challenge Grant Program; $44,225

·        2011   University of Oklahoma, College of Arts and Sciences, Junior Faculty Summer Fellowship

·        2011   University of Oklahoma, College of Arts and Sciences, Faculty Enrichment Grant

·        2011   PI: Miller; Co-PI: Deacon; Co-PI: Wedel; Co-PI: Fitzgerald – Norman Center for Children and Families Photovoice Project/Girl Power Photovoice. Seed grant awarded by the OU-TULSA Program in Community Health Research; $38,477

·        2010   University of Oklahoma, College of Arts and Sciences, Faculty Enrichment Grant

·        2009   University of Oklahoma, Research Council, Junior Faculty Research Program Grant

·        2009   University of Oklahoma, College of Arts and Sciences, Faculty Enrichment Grant

·        2008   University of Oklahoma, College of Arts and Sciences, Faculty Enrichment Grant

·        2008   University of Oklahoma, Office of the President, Presidential International Travel Fellowship

·        2007   University of Oklahoma, College of Arts and Sciences, Faculty Enrichment Grant

·        2007   Michigan State University Graduate School, Dissertation Completion Fellowship

·        2005   United States of America Department of State, Fulbright Student Fellowship

·        2004   Michigan State University International Studies and Programs, Walker-Hill International Pre-Dissertation Scholarship

·        2001   PI: Deacon - The well-being of Muslim refugee women in resettlement: A needs assessment. Student Award Program Grant awarded by the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Foundation