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University of Oklahoma

[H R 5703] International Human Relations - 492

professor
Zermarie Deacon

Course Description

International Human Relations

 

The goal of this course will be to familiarize you with significant international issues relevant to human relations. We will explore the meaning of being a Human Relations professional in an increasingly globalized world, including the role of human relations in addressing issues such as warfare, terrorism, gender discrimination, international issues affecting children, and definitions of and the protection of human rights. This is an online class; hence students will be expected to log on to the relevant Canvas page on a regular basis in order to complete assignments and to check for relevant updates and information. Various formats will be used to meet the learning objectives of the course, including discussion forums, papers, notes, video clips, etc.

Course Dates


DatesJuly 1 - August 31, 2022
Last day to enroll or drop without penaltyJune 2, 2022

Site Director

This is a three-credit hour online course. Please see your local Site Director or email our online site coordinator at aponline@ou.edu

Professor Contact Information


Course ProfessorZermarie Deacon, Ph.D.
Mailing Address601 Elm Avenue; PHSC 728, Norman, OK 73019
Telephone Number405-325-2749
Email Addresszermarie@ou.edu
Virtual Office HoursVirtual Office Hours will be posted on Canvas at the start of the class.
Professor availabilityThe professor will be available via email to students during the above listed Virtual Office Hours and other methods by arrangement.

Textbook(s) and Instructional Materials

Student materials are available at the OU Bookstore Website at https://ou.textbookx.com/institutional/index.php. The website has book selling, renting, buying, returning, and order tracking capabilities. If you need help with an order, or if you have any questions contact the toll-free phone at 1-(855)-790-6637, agents are available from 9a – 5p (EST) Monday – Friday. Text prices are available online.

 

Materials posted on the OU Canvas learning management system: Access Canvas at https://canvas.ou.edu, enter your OU NetID and password, and select course o access material. If you require assistance with Canvas, please click on the Help icon. You can search the Canvas guides, chat with Canvas support, or contact OU IT.

Please consult the Purdue University OWL website for information regarding APA format and general writing style: http://owl.english.purdue.edu. The OU Writing Center is also available to you at http://www.ou.edu/writingcenter.

Exploring International Human Rights Essential Readings
Exploring International Human Rights Essential Readings
by Callaway, Rhonda L.
Published by Rienner Publishers, Lynne
ISBN: 9781588264374
Required
The International Reader : Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Current Events and Global Issues
The International Reader : Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Current Events and Global Issues
by LaFever, Kat
Published by Cognella, Inc.
ISBN: 9781793557216
Required

OU Email

All official correspondence from instructors will be sent only to students’ ou.edu address.

 

Email Account and Canvas: Students are expected to check their OU email accounts and the course site on Canvas daily for updates from the instructor

 

Online Orientation

The College of Arts and Sciences offers an online orientation for students who are enrolled in online or blended courses. The purpose of the orientation is to ensure that students are well prepared both technically and practically to take online courses. The orientation can be found on their website at: http://www.ou.edu/content/cas/online/student-online-orientation.html

The College of Arts and Sciences Online and Academic Technology Services office is here to assist you with any questions, problems, or concerns you may have. For assistance visit their website at http://www.ou.edu/content/cas/online/student-information.html or contact them by telephone at: (405) 325-5854 or email: casonline@ou.edu

Course Objectives

The goal of this course will be to familiarize you with key international issues relevant to human relations. It is expected that you will not only become familiar with these issues, but that you will also develop the skills necessary to think critically about the various dimensions that impact the human experience across various international settings. These include, but are not limited to, gender, nation of origin, culture, etc. Finally, it is anticipated that you will begin to develop the skills necessary to work towards the resolution of significant international concerns such as poverty, terrorism, child labor, etc.

Course Outline

Module 1 – Globalization

Module 2 – Human rights

Module 3 – Gender-based repression

Module 4 – Witness to torture

Module 5 – Children as targets

Module 6 – The War on Terror

Assignments, Grading and Due Dates

You will be able to follow the course progression under the “modules” tab on Canvas. You will be expected to complete module-specific work and assignments as well as four major assignments. Module-specific work and assignments will include completing the assigned reading, participating in discussion posts, and providing reactions to materials posted online (e.g., videos, notes, etc.). Each module-specific assignment will be worth ten points. Five points will be possible simply for completing the assignment, two points will be possible for following the directions correctly, and three points will be possible for the overall quality of the work that is completed. If you complete a module-specific assignment late, your grade for that particular project will be reduced by 50%. Major assignments will receive a grade out of 100. Specific grading criteria will be provided for each major assignment.

 

Information regarding coursework is provided below, including information about major assignments. In addition, module-specific content will be updated by Monday of each week. You should thus aim to log on to Canvas on Monday or Tuesday of each week. Relevant content will be placed under the “modules” tab. Please also check the announcements and calendar regularly.

 

All assignments are due by 5:00pm CST on the due date.

 

 

Reading Material:

Over the course of the semester, you will be expected to complete numerous reading assignments. Multiple scholarly papers have been placed on Canvas (“course materials” tab). You will be expected to read these papers and to complete a reaction paper in response to the paper or chapter of your choice. You will also be expected to read all assigned chapters from Harrelson-Stephens (2007) as outlined in the module-specific information posted on Canvas. Finally, you will be expected to complete a book review relevant to this class. You may select a book from the list below, or you can select your own text. Any text that is not the list below needs to be approved by the instructor first. These books will not be provided by Extended Campus/Advanced Programs.

 

Book list:

  1. Blood and earth: Modern slavery, ecocide, and the secret to saving the world, K. Bales, 2016
  2. A long way gone: Memoirs of a boy soldier, I. Bea, 2007
  3. Night, E. Wiesel, 2006
  4. No good men among the living: America, the Taliban, and the war through Afghan war, A. Gopal, 2015
  5. The underground girls of Kabul: In search of hidden resistance in Afghanistan, J. Nordberg, 2015
  6. Poor Economics, Banerjee, A.V. & Duflo, E., 2012

 

Types of module-specific assignments:

 

Discussion posts:

During weeks where discussions posts are due, you will be expected to make two postings to the relevant discussion forum. First, you will be expected to post a response to the posed question. This response will be due by Wednesday of the week during which the assignment is due. Then, by Friday of that same week, you will be expected to post a response to at least one of your classmates. You are encouraged to engage in a dialogue with one another, however, a minimum of one response to your classmates is necessary. The professor will additionally make relevant postings to the forum.

During weeks that discussion posts are due, you will need to make both postings in order to receive full credit for the assignment. However, the assignment will only be considered late if you do not make the second posting on time. Failure to make the first posting on time will result in a two-point deduction for not following instructions correctly.

 

Reactions/responses:

During weeks that a response to online notes, videos, or the assigned readings are due, you will be expected to complete a written response to a reaction question. A question to which you are expected to respond, as well as the material needed to respond to the question and any relevant instructions, will be posted under the relevant module. Your response should be at least two double-spaced page long.

 

Major assignments:

Over the course of the semester, you will be expected to complete four major assignments. These will be outlined below.

 

Reaction papers:

Your reaction papers provide you with an informal, yet scholarly forum in which to respond to the assigned reading that has been placed under “course materials” on Canvas. Your papers should be three to five double-spaced pages long and should be proofread and spell and grammar checked. You are not expected to use outside sources, but rather, are expected to provide your own response and reaction to the assigned reading material. However, any outside sources should be cited appropriately. You should consider the following questions when completing your reaction papers: How are the issues the author raises relevant to international human relations? Do you agree with the author’s perspective? Why or why not? What are your reactions to the paper?

Additional instructions for completing these papers will be posted on Canvas. Your reaction papers will receive a grade out of 100, with papers demonstrating a high degree of critical thinking in response to the framing questions receiving the highest grades.

 

Book review:

Throughout the semester, you should be reading your selected text. You will be expected to complete a written review of this book. The book review should be three to five double-spaced pages long and should include your critical analysis of the book. In addition to your perspectives on the materials presented by the authors, I would like you to relate the material to what we have learned in class. Any outside sources should be cited appropriately using correct APA formatting.

Your paper should be typed using 12-point font and conventional margins, should be proofread and spell and grammar checked, and should be formatted using APA stylistic guidelines. All papers should be submitted to Canvas. Your paper will receive a grade out of 100 and will be graded using the following criteria: 20% for using appropriate formatting, etc.; 30% for critical thinking (i.e., the degree to which you provide a thoughtful analysis and discussion of the book); and 50% for the content of your paper (i.e., the degree to which you meet the requirements of the assignment).

Unless prior arrangements have been made with the professor, or you experience a documented personal emergency, all late papers will be subjected to a grade deduction. Five points will be deducted from papers handed in on the due date but after 5pm. Following the due date, ten points will be deducted for each day that your paper is late.

Please do not hesitate to contact the professor if you have any questions about this assignment.

 

Final paper:

For your final paper, you will be expected to select an issue relevant to international human relations to analyze. Specific instructions for selecting a topic will be posted on Canvas. You will additionally be required to obtain approval for your topic from the professor by the relevant date.

 

For your final paper, you should provide a thorough analysis of the issue that you have selected. You should not only discuss the reasons why this issue is relevant to international human relations, but you should additionally discuss potential solutions to this problem. As such, your paper should provide a thoughtful analysis of the issue that you choose to address. Additional instructions will be placed on Canvas.

 

You should use at least ten outside sources in your analysis, of which at least six should be scholarly books and/or journal articles. The other four sources may be websites of non-governmental organizations or agencies, newspaper articles, and/or reports published by international organizations such as Amnesty International, etc.

 

Your paper should be ten to fifteen double-spaced pages long, should be typed using 12-point font and conventional margins, should be proofread and spell and grammar checked, and should be formatted using APA stylistic guidelines.

 

Your paper will receive a grade out of 100 and will be graded using the following criteria: 20% for using appropriate formatting, etc.; 30% for critical thinking (i.e., the degree to which you provide a thoughtful analysis of the issue that you have selected); and 50% for the content of your paper (i.e., the degree to which you meet the requirements of the assignment).

 

Unless prior arrangements have been made with the professor, or you experience a documented personal emergency, all late papers will be subjected to a grade deduction. Five points will be deducted from papers handed in on the due date but after 5pm. Following the due date, ten points will be deducted for each day that your paper is late.

 

Please do not hesitate to contact the professor if you have any questions about this assignment.

 

Grading

This is a letter-graded course: A, B, C, D, or F. The following scale will be used: A = 90%-100%; B = 80%-89%; C = 70%-79%; D = 60%-69%; F = < 60%

Assignment Due Date Percent of Grade
Module-specific online assignments See Canvas 30%
Final paper topics due to the professor July 31, 5PM CST N/A
Reaction Paper 1 due July 24, 5PM CST 10%
Reaction Paper 2 due August 14, 5PM CST 10%
Book review due August 21, 5PM CST 20%
Final paper due August 31, 5PM CST 30%

Attendance Policy

In addition to interaction via Canvas and email contact, students are required to contact the instructor via email or telephone before the beginning of the course term for an initial briefing. Although physical class meetings are not part of this course, participation in all interactive, learning activities is required.

Student assignments and student/instructor communications will be conducted via Canvas, although students may contact the instructor via telephone, postal mail, email, or fax as needed.

Policy on Late Assignments

Please contact the professor regarding his/her policy for late work.

Incomplete Grade Policy

A grade of “I” is not automatically assigned, but rather must be requested by the student by submitting to the instructor a “Petition for and Work to Remove an Incompleted Grade” form. An “I” can never be used in lieu of an “F” nor can an “I” be assigned because of excessive failure to participate in class activities.

Technical Support Information

If you experience technical problems, contact Information Technology by visiting their website at: http://webapps.ou.edu/it/ or contacting them by telephone at: (405) 325-HELP (4357).

 

Materials posted on the OU CANVAS system:

Access CANVAS at http://canvas.ou.edu; enter your OU NetID (4+4) and password, and select course to access the material.

 

Procedures for Completion of Course Evaluation: 

Upon completion of the course students should go to the Advanced Programs Online Learning Information webpage and click on the applicable semester link under “Online Course Evaluation” which will direct them to the evaluation.  The evaluation will take approximately five minutes to complete.  Completion of the online evaluation is an important tool allowing Advanced Programs to gain information and student feedback for improvement of courses.

Your responses will be kept confidential.  They will be reviewed by the department and only supplied to the professor once grades for the course have been submitted.

 

Materials posted on the OU CANVAS system:

Access CANVAS at http://canvas.ou.edu; enter your OU NetID (4+4) and password, and select course to access material. Please contact your local the IT Help desk at 405-325-HELP if you require assistance.  IT is available 24/7

Statement about the MHR Program Planner and Human Relations Website

Students should become familiar with the MHR Program Planner that was sent to each student upon admission into the program.  The planner has a description of the HR program objectives and requirements, suggestions for graduate study, financial assistance, and graduation information. Of particular interest is the information on the comprehensive exams and the internship.  For further information please visit the Department of Human Relations Website at: http://www.ou.edu/cas/hr

Reasonable Accommodation Statement

The University of Oklahoma is committed to providing reasonable accommodation for all students with disabilities.  Any student in this course who has a disability that may prevent him or her from fully demonstrating his or her abilities should contact me personally as soon as possible so we can discuss accommodations necessary to ensure full participation and facilitate your educational opportunities.  Students with disabilities must be registered with the Office of Disability Services prior to receiving accommodations in this course.  The Office of Disability Services is located in Goddard Health Center, Suite 166, phone 405-325-3852 or TDD only 405-325-4173. For more information please see the Disability Resource Center website http://www.ou.edu/drc/home.html

 

Civility/Inclusivity Statement:

We understand our members represent a rich variety of backgrounds and perspectives. The Human Relations Department is committed to providing an atmosphere for learning that respects diversity. While working together to build this community we ask all members to:

  • share their unique experiences, values and beliefs
  • be open to the views of others
  • honor the uniqueness of their colleagues
  • appreciate the opportunity we have to learn from each other in this community
  • value each other’s opinions and communicate in a respectful manner
  • keep confidential discussions the community has of a personal (or professional) nature
  • use this opportunity together to discuss ways in which we can create an inclusive environment in this course and across the University of Oklahoma community.

Religious Holidays

It is the policy of the University to excuse absences of students that result from religious observances and to provide without a penalty for the rescheduling of examinations and additional required class work that may fall on religious holidays, without penalty.

POLICIES AND NOTICES

Attendance/Grade Policy

Attendance and participation in interaction, individual assignments, group exercises, simulations, role playing, etc. are valuable aspects of any course because much of the learning comes from discussions in class with other students. It is expected that you attend all classes and be on time except for excused emergencies.

Excused absences are given for professor mandated activities or legally required activities such as emergencies or military assignments. It is the policy of the University to excuse absences of students that result from religious observances and to provide without penalty for the rescheduling of examinations and additional required class work that may fall on religious holidays. Unavoidable personal emergencies, including (but not limited to) serious illness; delays in getting to class because of accidents, etc.; deaths and funerals, and hazardous road conditions will be excused.

If you are obtaining financial assistance (TA, STAP, FA, VA, Scholarship, etc.) to pay all or part of your tuition cost, you must follow your funding agency/institution’s policy regarding “I” (Incomplete) grades unless the timeline is longer than what the University policy allows then you must adhere to the University policy. Students who receive Financial Aid must resolve/complete any “I” (Incomplete) grades by the end of the term or he/she may be placed on “financial aid probation.” If the “I” grade is not resolved/completed by the end of the following term, the student’s Financial Aid may be suspended make the student ineligible for further Financial Aid.

Students are responsible for meeting the guidelines of Tuition Assistance and Veterans Assistance. See the education counselor at your local education center for a complete description of your TA or VA requirements.

OU faculty will submit grades online through ONE not later than 30 days after the course end date. Course end dates are approximately one calendar month after the final seminar date on this syllabus and are provided on the official scheduling website for reference.

Academic Integrity and Student Conduct 

Academic integrity means honesty and responsibility in scholarship. Academic assignments exist to help students learn; grades exist to show how fully this goal is attained. Therefore all work and all grades should result from the student's own understanding and effort.

Academic misconduct is any act which improperly affects the evaluation of a student’s academic performance or achievement. Misconduct occurs when the student either knows or reasonably should know that the act constitutes misconduct. Academic misconduct includes: cheating and using unauthorized materials on examinations and other assignments; improper collaboration, submitting the same assignment for different classes (self-plagiarism); fabrication, forgery, alteration of documents, lying, etc…in order to obtain an academic advantage; assisting others in academic misconduct; attempting to commit academic misconduct; destruction of property, hacking, etc…; intimidation and interference with integrity process; and plagiarism. All students should review the Student’s Guide to Academic Integrity at http://integrity.ou.edu/students_guide.html 

Students and faculty each have responsibility for maintaining an appropriate learning environment. All students should review policies regarding student conduct at http://studentconduct.ou.edu/ 

Accommodation Statement

The University of Oklahoma is committed to making its activities as accessible as possible. For accommodations on the basis of disability, please contact your local OU Site Director.

Adjustment for Pregnancy/Childbirth-Related Issues

Should you need modifications or adjustments to your course requirements because of documented pregnancy-related or childbirth-related issues, please contact the professor as soon as possible to discuss. Generally, modifications will be made where medically necessary and similar in scope to accommodations based on temporary disability. Please see http://www.ou.edu/content/eoo/faqs/pregnancy-faqs.html

Title IX Resources

For any concerns regarding gender-based discrimination, sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, stalking, or intimate partner violence, the University offers a variety of resources, including advocates on-call 24/7, counseling services, mutual no-contact orders, scheduling adjustments, and disciplinary sanctions against the perpetrator. Please contact the Sexual Misconduct Office at smo@ou.edu or (405) 325-2215 (8-5), or the Sexual Assault Response Team at (405) 615 -0013 (24/7) to report an incident. To learn more about Title IX, please visit the Institutional Equity Office’s website at http://www.ou.edu/content/eoo.html 

Course Policies

Extended Campus (also and formerly known as Advanced Programs) policy is to order books in paperback if available. Courses, dates, and professors are subject to change. Please check with your OU Site Director. Students should retain a copy of any assignments that are e/mailed to the professor for the course. Neither duplicating services nor office supplies are provided.

Any and all course materials, syllabus, lessons, lectures, etc. are the property of professor teaching the course and the Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma and are protected under applicable copyright.

For more information about OU Extended Campus, visit our website at: http://www.goou.ou.edu/


Statement on Respect

The classroom should provide a safe learning environment where students can express their views without fear of reprisal. That freedom of expression must be balanced by demonstrated respect for other’s viewpoints and appropriate and reasonable sensitivity, especially within the context of scholarly disagreement.  Disrespectful or uncivil dialogue (including, but not limited to, personal attacks, insults, or harassment) will not be tolerated.


Recording Devices/Phones/Computers

It is important for students to be fully present during class to fully benefit from lectures, discussions, and experiential assignments. Class sessions may not be tape-recorded. All telephones and pagers should be turned off or placed on silent mode. Computers may not be used during class. Students who require an exception to this policy should discuss exceptional circumstances with the professor.

INSTRUCTOR VITA

Zermarie Deacon

Education

  • 2007 Ph.D., Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan Department of Psychology. Cognate: Gender and International Development. Dissertation: An examination of factors influencing Mozambican women’s attainment of post-war well-being.
  • 2003 M.A., Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan Department of Psychology. Thesis: The well-being of Muslim refugee women in resettlement: A needs assessment
  • 1997 B.A. (Honours) Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa, Department of Politics; Major: Political Philosophy
  • 1996 B.A., Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa, Major: Politics; Major: Philosophy

Current Positions

  • 2007 - 2013 Department of Human Relations, University of Oklahoma, Assistant Professor
  • 2007 – Present Affiliate Faculty, School of International and Area Studies
  • 2008 - Present Women’s Studies Program, University of Oklahoma, Adjunct Professor
  • 2012 – Present Women’s and Gender Studies Program Center for Social Justice, University of Oklahoma, Affiliate Faculty
  • 2013 – Present Department of Human Relations, University of Oklahoma, Associate Professor

Frequently Taught Advanced Programs Courses

  • International Human Relations
  • Current Problems in Human Relations

Major Areas of Teaching and Research Interest

  • In addition to Current Problems in Human Relations I also teach International Human Relations and Strategies for Social Change at the graduate level. At the undergraduate level I teach a class entitled Gender and War as well as International Human Relations and Social Change Processes.
  • My primary research interests are in cross-cultural definitions of health and wellbeing and factors that facilitate individuals’ attainment of wellbeing across different ecological contexts.

Representative Publications and Presentations

Refereed Publications:

  • Miller, C., Deacon, Z., Smith, A., Brady, S. R (2021). Visions of health: The Girl Power Photovoice project. Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology, 13(1), 43-56.
  • Deacon, Z. (2017). Review of: Stop global street harassment: Growing activism around the world. [Review of the book Stop global street harassment: Growing activism around the world, by H. Kearl]. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 41(1), 132.
  • Sykes, B., Pendley, J., & Deacon, Z. (2017). Transformative learning, citizenship, and cultural restoration: A case study of Native American service-learning at a research university. Gateways: International Journal of Community Research and Engagement, 10, 204-228.
  • Miller, C., Deacon, Z., Smith, A., & Abernathy, P. (in press). Visions of health: The Girl Power Photovoice project in D. Moxley, J. Bishop, & J. Miller-Cribs (Eds), Photovoice methods in social work: Using visual and narrative techniques in participatory research and practice.
  • Moxley, D. P., Thompson, V., & Deacon, Z. (2017). Donor involvement in Community-Based Action Research: A typology for advancing reflexive decision-making to protect essential participatory values in L. Rowell, C. D. Bruce, J. M. Sosh, & M. M. Riel (Eds), The Palgrave international handbook of action research, 563-578. New York, NY: Pelgrave Macmillan US.
  • Miller, C., Deacon, Z., & Fitzgerald, K. (2015). Visions of collaboration: The Girl Power Photovoice project. Journal of Community Engagement and Scholarship, 8(1), 98-105.
  • Moxley, D., Deacon, Z., & Thompson, V. (2013, July). Action research and development for intrinsic innovation in social service administration: Prototyping and proof of concept in small scale start-ups. Action Learning and Action Research Journal, 18(2), 37-68.
  • Miller, C., Deacon, Z., & Fitzgerald, K. (2015). Visions of collaboration: The Girl Power Photovoice project. Journal of Community Engagement and Scholarship.
  • Moxley, D., Deacon, Z., & Thompson, V. (2013, July). Action research and development for intrinsic innovation in social service administration: Prototyping and proof of concept in small scale start-ups. Action Learning and Action Research Journal, 18(2), 37-68.
  • Deacon, Z. & Moxley, D. (2012). Donors as stakeholders in Participatory Research: Praxis as typology in assessing and framing their roles. Action Learning, Action Research Association Inc. Monograph Series. (No. 3).
  • Deacon, Z. Pendley, J., Hinson, W., & Hinson, J. (2011). Chokka-chaffa' kilimpi', Chikashshiyaakni' kilimpi': Strong family, strong nation. American Indian and Alaskan Natives Mental Health Research: The Journal of the National Center, 18(2), 41-63.
  • Deacon, Z. & Bert, S. (2010). Teaching diversity: A reflection on the impact of identity on our work as educators. Free Inquiry in Creative Sociology, 38(1), 35-45.
  • Deacon, Z. (2010). Mozambique: The gendered impact of warfare. In T. Falola & H. ter Haar (Eds). Narrating wars and peace in Africa (pp.141-154). Rochester, NY: University of Rochester Press.
  • Deacon, Z. & Sullivan, C. (2010). An ecological examination of rural Mozambican women’s attainment of post-war well-being. Journal of Community Psychology, 38(1), 115-330.
  • Deacon, Z. & Sullivan, C. (2009). Responding to the complex and gendered needs of refugee women. Affilia: Journal of Women and Social Work.

Presentations:

  • Deacon,, Nhkata, D., & Acar, H. (2021, June). Understanding intersectional inequalities in postsecondary education: Retention, connectedness, Black Women, and STEM. Poster presented at the 18th Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action, online.
  • Miller, C., Noyori-Corbett, C., Deacon, (2019, May). GirlPower Photovoice Project. Paper presented at the The Asian Conference on the Social Sciences, Tokyo, Japan.
  • Deacon, Z. & Miller, C. R. (2018, October). Decolonizing service learning. Poster presented at the7th Annual International Conference of Community Psychology,
  • Santiago, Chile.
  • Moxley, D., Thompson, V., & Deacon, Z. (2016, April). Donor Influence in Community- Based Action Research: A Typology for Advancing Reflexive Decision-Making to Protect Essential Participatory Values. In L. Rowell (Chair), International Action Research: Sharing Public Scholarship in Diverse Global Educational Contexts. Symposium presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association.
  • Deacon, Z. (2015, June). Conducting effective, ethical, and collaborative cross-cultural and social change oriented research under complex circumstances. Roundtable conducted at the 15th biennial conference of the Society for Community Research and Action, Lowell, Massachusetts.
  • Deacon, Z. & Miller, C. (2015, June). Effective and transformative service learning. Roundtable conducted at the 15th biennial conference of the Society for Community Research and Action, Lowell, Massachusetts.
  • Miller-Cribs, J., Miller, G., Miller, C. R., Deacon, Z., & Moxley, D. (2014, January). Using Photovoice in Social Work practice research to enhance community-university partnership. Workshop conducted at the Society for Social Work and Research annual conference, San Antonio, Texas.
  • Miller, C. R. & Deacon, Z. (2013, October/November). Photovoice as group work. Roundtable presented at the 59th annual program meeting of the Council of Social Work Education, Washington, D.C.
  • Lien, A., Darlston-Jones, D., Dworkin, D., Grohe, H., Barlow, J., Ronayne, M., Thai, N., Belyaev-Glantsman, O, Rowley, R., Long, S., & Deacon, Z. (2013, June). Social justice in the classroom: Teaching controversial topics. Roundtable Presentation held at the Biennial Conference of the Society for Research and Action, Miami, Florida.
  • Deacon, Z. & Pendley, J. (2013, May). Using Photovoice to generate change in one American Indian tribe. Paper presented at the 9th international Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, Urbana-Champaign, Illinois.
  • Miller, C., Deacon, Z., Smith, A. (2012, November). The GirlPower Photovoice Project: A vision of partnership. Poster presented at the 58th annual program meeting of the Council of Social Work Education, Washington, D.C.
  • Miller-Cribbs, J., Miller, C., Deacon, Z., Miller, G. (2012, November). Using Photovoice in Social Work practice research to enhance community-university partnerships. Paper presented at the 58th annual program meeting of the Council of Social Work Education, Washington, D.C.
  • Chapple, C., Bones, P., Worthen, M., & Deacon, Z. (2012, November). Ecological correlates of sex trafficking in Oklahoma. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Chicago, Illinois.
  • Simons-Rudolph, J. M., Zimmerman, L., Deacon, Z., Olson, B. (2011, August). Examining the future of international community psychology to address global needs. (Paavola, E. & Amer, M. M., Chairs). Conversation hour held at the 119th Convention of the American Psychological Association, Washington, D.C.
  • Deacon, Z. & Bert, S. (2010, October). Teaching diversity: The impact of race and gender on our experiences as instructors. Structured discussion held at the Institute for the Study and Promotion of Race and Culture’s annual Diversity Challenge, Boston, Massachusetts.
  • Deacon, Z. (2010, June). Indigenous approaching to post-war recovery amongst Mozambican women. In Katie Thomas (Chair), Traditions for tomorrow: Indigenous and lived wisdoms. Symposium presented at the 3rd International Conference on Community Psychology, Puebla, Mexico.
  • Deacon, Z. (2010, June). Resolving challenges inherent in forming campus-community partnerships with indigenous communities. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on Community Psychology, Puebla, Mexico.

Representative Honors and Awards Received

  • PI: Deacon; Co-PI: Acar; Co-PI: Nkhata - Understanding intersectional inequalities in postsecondary education: Education, retention, connectedness, black women, and STEM. Inequities in the Academic Research and Creative Activity Enterprise Rapid Response Seed Grant Opportunity.
  • 2011 PI: Deacon; Co-PI: Pendley (Center for Applied Social Research, OU); Co- PI: Jervis (Center for Applied Social Research, OU) – CHRs as facilitators of health for Chickasaw elders. OU Center for Research Program Development and Enrichment, Faculty Research Challenge Grant Program; $44,225
  • 2011 University of Oklahoma, College of Arts and Sciences, Junior Faculty Summer Fellowship
  • 2011 University of Oklahoma, College of Arts and Sciences, Faculty Enrichment Grant
  • 2011 PI: Miller; Co-PI: Deacon; Co-PI: Wedel; Co-PI: Fitzgerald – Norman Center for Children and Families Photovoice Project/Girl Power Photovoice. Seed grant awarded by the OU-TULSA Program in Community Health Research; $38,477
  • 2010 University of Oklahoma, College of Arts and Sciences, Faculty Enrichment Grant